Wednesday, March 1, 2017

IWSG old stories and BATTLE OF THE BANDS

If you are only here for the BATTLE OF THE BANDS keep scrolling until you see the BotB logo. If you are only here for the IWSG, read until you see the BOTB badge.

Rachel Platten Fight Song




I suppose you are wondering why I'm posting a song video first before the Insecure Writers Support Group logo?  Well, FIGHT SONG is my IWSG post for this month. I hope you listen as you read, or just listen. This song is about self confidence, and is both my encouragement and insecurity.

I am a firm believer that you have to believe in yourself first before anyone else can believe in you.No matter what you want to be or do with your life, you have to have self confidence to achieve it. Some people equate this self confidence with arrogance, or a false sense of self worth. I struggle with this distinction constantly.

When I was in kindergarten or grade school I read a children's book called THE LITTLE ENGINE THAT COULD. Silly to be with me all these years, I know. But way back then (like, 50 years ago) my parents were told I was mentally retarded (in today's educational vernacular I'd likely be considered Attention Deficit Disorder). I THINK I CAN became my motto for life. That little engine believed in himself despite the doubts of everyone else, and so I believed in myself. (Most of the time) Over the years there have been other stories and songs that have encouraged me to believe in myself, but when I'm at my lowest point, I THINK I CAN, has always been my fall back mantra.

Until Rachel Platten sang: I don't really care what anyone else believes, cuz I still got a lot of faith left in me.. .. I might only have one match, but I can make an explosion.

As an author, I have to believe in my ability to write a good story before I ever set pen to paper (or open a word program and touch the keyboard). I believe every artist - painters, writers, actors, musicians, singers, comics, athletes, designers . . politicians) need to have that faith in themselves first before they can convince anyone else to believe in their talents. In my opinion, this is not arrogance or false hope; its ambition. The more you believe in yourself, the harder you will work to achieve your potential. That potential is easier reached when others also believe in and encourage you; but you have to continue to believe in yourself despite obstacles and failures. For authors, obstacles and failures equates to rejections, and self doubt that keeps projects locked away from public scrutiny.




This month's IWSG question is: Have you ever pulled out a really old story and reworked it? Did it work out?

Some authors have been writers since the first day they learned to write their ABC's into coherent sentences. I've always been good at writing stories, everybody has told me so since grade school. But I was around 15 when I wrote my first serious novel- and yes, its still in the "drawer" because it is so bad I can't read it long enough to figure out how to revise it, But its my first ever writing project that wasn't an assignment in school, so I keep it as a memento.

I was about 40 when I wrote a novel I seriously wanted to publish. I did sub it out soon after it was completed, and I learned many writing lessons from those original rejected submissions and the subsequent signing with a vanity publisher. As I learn more about writing techniques, I pull this novel out, along with its three sequels, and edit it. One of the writing rules I've learned is that you can never publish your first novel.

Technically, this isn't my "first novel." LOL. Stephen King's DARK TOWER series was in a drawer for over twenty years, always in the back of his mind, before he pulled it out and seriously started work on it for publication. J.R.R. Tolkien told THE HOBBIT to his children as bed time stories, and worked on THE LORD OF THE RINGS trilogy for over 40 years before publication. I keep these minor facts in mind as inspiration.

But sometimes, it just doesn't happen that you can pull that project out again later, revise and edit it into saleable product. Sometimes we have to say goodbye entirely to a well loved concept. Sometimes an agent/publisher picks it up, but the final published version feels so far from the original project it is unrecognizable to the author. We cry for these "deleted darlings." We mourn the loss or our original ideas, the characters and plots that have been deemed useless by writing partners, or editors. Sometimes we have the vague hope that the characters, concepts, phrases and snappy dialogue, can be salvaged and integrated into other projects. And sometimes, we have ceremonies as we relegate them into a virtual recycle bin (or actual trash if the project is in paper notebooks).

"WE'VE COME A LONG WAY FROM WHERE WE BEGAN . . .THAT BOND WILL NEVER BE BROKEN . . . THE LOVE WILL NEVER BE LOST"




What is your "fight song" writing project? Is it still floating in your Documents, occasionally opened and edited? Or have you published it somehow: integrated into another project, rewritten according to editor requirements, revamped for short story anthologies, self published?

Please thank your IWSG host Alex Cavanaugh, and his helpers Tamara Narayan, Patsy Collins, M.J. Field, and Nichole Christopherson by visiting their blogs. Click here for the IWSG sign up list.

And thank you for reading this ramble.



Because today is the first, and Battle of the Bands posts on the first and fifteenth of each month, I also wanted to participate in BotB to show my support for my buddy Saint Mac, aka Stephen T McCarthy. Obviously I'm not finding any covers for Rachel Platten's Fight Song (or at least none worth posting for a battle), and given the nature of this month's IWSG question, I decided to find something with a similar courageous sentiment. And of course, I wanted to make this choice difficult because, as writers, all the decisions about a WiP are difficult. In today's vernacular, it comes with angst.

My song choices today are not pitting the same song against an opposing artist. Its about who accomplished the overall sentiment of the song "concept." Because publication, in any form of writing from books, movies, theater, poetry, songs; is based on reader/viewer/listener connection with the message.

I am also not posting any IMBD or Wickipedia write ups about these two songs. I've read it all, but I have these songs on CD, with artist insights of the song meanings; and have loved and followed the artists for more years than most of the BotB participants have been alive (excluding Arlee Bird and Saint Mac himself of course; they are older than me by a few months if not a few years).

Both these songs are about a son, following and lamenting their heroic fathers death. Bosephus was always considered his father's shadow, a mini Hank; and David Gilmour never came to terms with his father's death as a soldier, though he was expected to carry on the family military tradition.

I'm hoping you do not judge these songs by whether or not you like Hank Jr, or Pink Floyd, or country or pop or heavy metal. I think the song message of each artist transcends musical genre; but what do I know, I'm an eclectic listener.

To me, both songs display visceral writing. It is unfortunate that the Pink Floyd video includes such evocative imagery; I'd suggest you close your eyes while listening, but in truth I do not want you to miss the explicit tragedy of war. I first heard the Tigers song off The Final Cut CD, and cried through the entire short song. Well, I cried for Hank Jr also. I'm sentimental that way.

Both are stories the artists felt compelled to tell. As authors, isn't our first true writing the story we feel needs to be told, whether it be fact or fiction? If you are a musician as well as author, do you feel the same passion for writing/playing music as you do for story writing?

Bosephus (Hank Williams Jr) SHADOW FACE



David Gilmour (Pink Floyd)  When the Tigers Broke Free





Please vote for which song you feel best evokes an emotional response in you as a listener. Listen to the actual words. And if you feel nothing for either song, vote for which one you dislike least.

Thanks for stopping by. Have a great weekend.

47 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I'd have to pick Floyd over Williams because rock trumps country.
Sometimes those earlier works were just practice, and that's all right. Whatever helps us to improve.

Yolanda Renée said...

Donna, I suffer from the same lack of confidence, mainly because I was told by my parents how stupid I was and how I'd never amount to anything. Childhood can kill those assets we need to carry us through adulthood successfully. I still have times of intense doubts, it's a daily struggle.

But when an editor tells you, your only talent lies in the ideas you have, and not in the writing. Well, lets just say, OUCH! But I'll take it and continue to learn the craft that I want to conquer! And yes, that set me back about a week - just last month too! :)

But, I didn't get through my childhood because I gave up and I'll not give up now - fighting until the day I die - I'll prove the world and my parents wrong or die trying. Sounds great, but the honest truth is, it's me that I have to get past!

My new motto!
Yes, I can! I am! I will! I dare! I do!

Go for it!
You are an amazing storyteller and writer! Truly, I bow to your talent and can't wait to see more from you!

Arlee Bird said...

Mentally retarded! What a thing to be told as a child, but the Little Engine is a great inspiration. I used to love that story when I was little. I can remember when I was a kid my father would sometimes chant "I think I can" to encourage my sister and I when we were struggling with something.

Never heard the Hank Williams, Jr song before but it's a wonderful and powerful song. I like it a lot and Hank really gives a poignant performance.

Gilmour is a big favorite of both mine and my wife, who doesn't like too much modern music. I actually don't recall ever having heard this song before either. I found it a bit tedious and not quite up to par with Pink Floyd's other work. It's good but they can't have a cigar for that one.

My vote goes bigly to Hank.

Arlee Bird
Tossing It Out

Lexa Cain said...

I loved the Little Engine That Could! It's sad that 50 yrs ago certain mental challenges weren't recognized and no one knew what to do with the children. I really like the Rachel Platten quote. I think you're right about first novels. I'm lucky all the agents turned down my first effort many yrs ago 'coz it was awful! lol

Pat Hatt said...

Have to keep on keeping on indeed and sure a great song to keep one going. Fine line between self confidence and being a cocky sob though. One just has to watch that. Childhood can sure be made even harder by getting put down. My vote goes to #2, Floyd for the win.

Deniz Bevan said...

Ooh, now that's a fun battle of the bands. I'll have to come back and vote after I've listened to the others because only Pink Floyd is familiar to me...
I think of Tolkien too! He started LoTR in the late 1930s and the first one was only published in 1954! I feel less snail-ish thinking of that...

L. Diane Wolfe said...

I hate having to give up on a story, but I did for the book I'm writing. One of the four stories just wasn't working and it's been with me forever. Had to discard it though.

Pink Floyd! I have to vote for one of my favorite bands.

Hart Johnson said...

The Fight Song is definitely a good one for writers. This is a marathon with a lot of hills. And you were YOUNG if you finished a novel at 15. I had half a dozen stories with 10-30 pages written at that age, but it took rereading the Harry Potter books and writing some fan fiction (at nearly 40) to understand I am a person who needs an ending or I meander off into nothingness.

Christine Rains said...

Fantastic inspiration! So wonderful that you had that mantra to help push yourself through. I had no idea about those little facts about King and Tolkien. So neat! Never give up. And my vote is for Pink Floyd too!

Gwen Gardner said...

Earlier works are cringe-worthy, LOL. Not sure if I still have my first novel. But confidence helps in the moving on. I go back and forth, but in the end I think I can make it :) P.S. I went to the Dark Side of the Moon concert in 1974--now I'm telling my age. LOL.

Crystal Collier said...

You know, I think sometimes the opposition is exactly what we need to make sure we actually achieve. First novels can work out, but only if we're willing to do what it takes to really make them shine. (I've got a trunked novella from when I was 12 too. It will never see the light of day. LOL.) Here's to overcoming, no matter what we hear.

N. R. Williams said...

The Little Engine That Could saw me through many tough times. Self-Confidence differs from a grandiose opinion of oneself because we are balanced, thoughtful, and we don't project our failures onto others, but accept them and learn from them. A narcissistic person will always blame others for their own short comings.

Good post.
Nancy

Mary Burris said...

I am a fan of both Pink Floyd and Hank Jr, but neither of these songs do anything for me. I could only listen to Hank for a minute or two before I had to shut him up. The song was just too repetitive for my tastes.

On the other hand, the background sound of Pink Floyd came across just a little too strong. I bet if it were a bit quieter we could hear the vocals better and they would be more compelling to listen to.

That being said, I think I'm going to give my vote to Hank Jr because while he was repetitive, at least I could easily make out his words.

Great concept of a battle!

~Mary

Tamara Narayan said...

I think you are right. We may produce novels with the hope of publication, but our first audience member is ourselves. If we don't believe in the story, it is likely no one else will. If it takes arrogance to create a universe and the people who inhabit it, so be it.

Stephen Tremp said...

Donna I totally agree. I'm not arrogant. I'm ambitious. Although I am a shameless self promoter.

Olga Godim said...

Nothing wrong with believing in yourself, and the feeling of self-worth is never false. I love your motto "I think I can." Like you, I had a book/heroine that supported me in my life's travails, but it wasn't anything as charming as your Little Engine. It was - don't laugh - indomitable and sexy Angelique from Anne Golon's adventure series. Angelique had all those horrible woes in every book of the series, overcame so many adversities, but she emerged stronger and more beautiful from each of her harrowing escapades. She was my role model for many years, when I was younger. She taught me to believe in myself.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

What a great story you have from being told you were 'retarded' to be a writer and having the confidence to do it. Yeah for Fight Song.

mshatch said...

The Little Engine that Could is one of my favorite stories. I don't have my original copy but I think I have my son's...

Nancy Gideon said...

You ROCK, Donna! Ambition, focus, perseverance - great words for the drive that keeps us going, to become better, to believe in ourselves. Yes We Can!!
I loved the Little Engine That Could and read the original to my grandson!

Caitlin Coppola said...

Thank you so much for posting what you did (Fight Song and keeping faith). It's what I needed to hear. And read!!

farawayeyes said...

Some really great inspiration in this post. Much of i you have already given me. Can't express how much I appreciate everything you've done to push me as a critique partner. You always tell me what I need to hear,not what i want but what i need. Thanks for that, and for this post today.
'
My vote is for Bocephus.

Juneta Key said...

What a moving post. Keep the faith girl. Fight Song is one of my favorite too. Sounds some of those talking to you were pessimistic and defeatist. You will win because you keep the faith. "I will persist until I succeed." Og Mandino. Its a fact. The one who succeeds is the one who does not quit. It is kind of a physic thing, universal law or something.

My pick Pink Floyd.

POWERFUL WORDS GIRL... LOVE THEM.
"Until Rachel Platten sang: I don't really care what anyone else believes, cuz I still got a lot of faith left in me.. .. I might only have one match, but I can make an explosion."

Juneta @ Writer's Gambit


Lynda R Young said...

My first novel, like yours, is one that will never see the light of day. There is far too much wrong for it to be resurrected in any usable way.

Denise Covey said...

Hi Donna! Thanks for visiting my blog and for your comment. I love Pink's Fight Song! Rah! You know all about my vamp fight so I won't go on, but I do have high hopes. Joanna Penn convinced me that self-publishing was the ONLY way to go but it has to be done properly!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Donna - people didn't really consider how they labelled us as kids - I too was put down ... but as you say we develop other skills. So keep writing, keep being creative, keep believing ...and self-publish ... as you have control. Loved Rachel's song, while Pink Floyd have always been a favourite ... take care and good luck with your future ... cheers Hilary

Cathy Kennedy said...

Donna,

I had two strikes against me as a kid. First my hearing. I didn't know that was the problem until I was an adult but poor hearing due to ear infections, sinus conditions, and scarring made it hard to sound out words in grade school which resulted in being a slow, apprehensive reader. I felt left behind in this area. To make matters worse and the teacher called on me often times to read aloud which was a horrible to blow to my self-confidence because I stumbled over every word. I felt stupid and small. I was always a couple of years behind on my reading scores in school. The Little Engine is a great story of what one can accomplish when he/she believes. It took me a lot of years to truly believe in myself and while I know there's always limitations, it doesn't stop me from trying to do my best in whatever I set out to do. :)

Good battle song choices. I'm going with Hank Williams, Jr.!

Nicki Elson said...

GREAT motivational song - it made excellent background as I read your inspirational words. You're right - we have to believe in ourselves before we can expect anybody else to.

mike spain said...

I enjoyed the deep track by Pink Floyd. But my vote goes for Hank Williams Jr, I had never heard that song before. Thanks for sharing!

John Holton said...

I'll be honest, I didn't like Hank Williams' voice, and his song seemed to drag. Both of them did, actually, but it was less unpleasant to listen to Pink Floyd. They get my vote here.

Stephen T. McCarthy said...

WILD THING (You Make Everything Gr-oooo-vy!) ~

Believe it or not, I came here yesterday and read every word. But I couldn't listen to the videos at work and knew my comment would require me to be at home where I could give it my best. So now I've read it all a second time and I'm ready to rumble...

>>... I also wanted to participate in BotB to show my support for my buddy Saint Mac, aka Stephen T McCarthy.

First, I want to say thanks for that. I appreciate the support. BOTB seems to be dying a slow death, so it's nice to get a little infusion once in awhile. Thank you.

>>... But way back then (like, 50 years ago) my parents were told I was mentally retarded

Damn! When I was in kindergarten, my teacher told my Ma that I was "anti-social". This was about the time when Oswald killed Kennedy (he didn't really) and the press was constantly referring to Oswald as anti-social. It was a big buzzword at the time. My Ma was so furious that she immediately yanked me out of kindergarten and I didn't go back to school until first grade. As a result, I always tell people that "I flunked kindergarten". Ha!

Wild Thing, do I seem anti-social to you? Because you don't seem mentally retarded to me.

>>... I was around 15 when I wrote my first serious novel

I was about the same age when I started writing a book. It was to be titled 'SIR, YES, SIR!' and all about my experiences in the Police Explorer program. I got quite a ways into it and then set it aside as my anger started to dissipate. I went back and read what I had written some years later and it was so bad I threw it in the trash before anyone else might accidentally find and read it.

>>... What is your "fight song" writing project?

I don't have a fight song writing project, but I DO have a fight song. Isn't (Link:] "LONG PROMISED ROAD" absolutely fantastic?! I get fired up every single time I listen to it. And at the point where the horns and guitar take over, I am positively ready to rumble!

I liked your BOTB concept. Plus, David Gilmour is one of my Top 10 favorite guitarists ever, and I am a huge Bocephus fan. (I saw Bocephus in concert once, and I think he was the only person in the theatre who was drunker'n I was. Ha!) So, you've selected two artists I really like.

I think I'm going to vote for BOCEPHUS, as it was more of a song. Whereas Gilmour's piece was like a recitation... and kind of difficult to hear, too.

You said something in this blog bit that really caught my attention and made me think. You wrote:

>>... The more you believe in yourself, the harder you will work to achieve your potential.

I never thought of it like that before. I have always believed I could write. Even write well. But perhaps I've been fooling myself all this time. Maybe, down deep, I have never really, truly, believed in myself all that much. The fact that I wrote some things (short stories, a screenplay, a manuscript for a children's book) and then just kind of gave up on it all is evidence that I don't really believe in myself as a writer. Hmmm.... Food 4 tawt.

Well, thanks again for playing BOTB with us, Wild Thing. You made BOTB groovy again (MBGA). I think I'm gonna go trim my fingernails now, drink a six-pack of cold and flu medicine, and go back to bed.

~ D-FensDogG
Check out my new blog @
(Link:] Stephen T. McCarthy Reviews...

dolorah said...

Alex: I can live with practice. Thanks for your vote.

Yolanda: editors can be as brutal as parents, and other well wishers. But sometimes we can learn from the harshness, if we eventually feel it has an inkling of merit. No reason you can’t get a second opinion on that decree though. Perhaps that editor isn’t the right one for you. A tough skin only should take so much before calling it abuse.

ArLee: Well, sometimes the diagnosis is correct. And when it is, it does help the child to know their limitations, and to accommodate them. I just don’t think that was my educational problem. As for the Battle; no this was not Pink’s best song. Gilmour went through a very selfish, depressive period with his music, which was likely the final conflict between himself and Waters, who left the group. Gilmour’s outspoken hatred of the monarchy and his inconsolable loss of his father turned his music quite sour for a while. Thanks for your vote.

Lexa: But look how far our knowledge of learning disorders have come over the last twenty years or so. Kids are no longer just slapped with a standard label and ignored. Progress. Just as our first writing projects are a learning process. We had to start somewhere, right?

Pat: life is a learning lesson. Thanks for your vote.

Deniz: lol, yeah, I remember how long some iconic authors worked on their masterpiece prior to publication and feel better when its takes me seemingly forever to write a short story. Or a blog post.

L Diane: so sorry that story did not work out. Its time will come though, as long as it keeps niggling at your mind. Thank for your vote.

Hart: I always thought of it as a novel – I was young – but after reading this, I think it was more of a novella. But yeah, about 40k hand written. At least you have always kept at it; started young and never gave it up. For some reason, I find specific endings unfulfilling. My mind likes to provide my own interpretation. I annoy a lot of readers that way, lol.

Christine: never give up! Thanks for your vote.

dolorah said...

Gwen: I’ve been relieved to know most authors have their cringe-worthy first projects, lol. I would love to see Pink Floyd in concert. We are all probably too old for that.

Crystal: overcoming is the best way to thumb our noses at nay-sayers, lol.

Nancy: very insightful. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Mary; hmm, you’re the second person to say the sound quality was bad for Pink. I’ve lost so much of my hearing I didn’t notice. Plus, I’m used a lot of background effects on Pink’s themed albums. You’d hate their four CD OFF THE WALL albums, lol. Thanks for your vote.

Tamara: I like that – our first audience is ourselves.

Steve: Well, if you were promoting someone else it wouldn’t be shameless. I am impressed by the amount of promoting you accomplish. I’d hire you in a heartbeat if I had something to promote.

Olga: ah, the original girl-power series? And look how awesome you became because of her influence. No guilt for that. Keep it up Girl.

Susan: yay for Fight Song

Marcy: I haven’t seen a copy of the book in years and years.

Nancy: Hello; nice to meet you. Thanks for your encouraging support.

Caitlin: so happy to have inspired you today.

FAE: you are awesome, and so is your writing. Keep the faith. And thanks for your vote.

Juneta: life has moved on since then, but yes, I still believe, though some of the pessimism has lingered. Thank you for your vote.

Lynda: we all have to start somewhere.

Denise: well, ya know, I think almost all of Mark Twain’s novels were self published and self promoted. Can’t go wrong with that kind of recommendation.

Hilary: You are so talented as a travel writer, I adore your writings. I am glad you also found an outlet for your genius.

Cathy: one of my son’s was labeled ADHD at about four years old. I never agreed with the term, and never saw positive results from the medications and therapies. When he was in late teens he was tested for learning disabilities, and was told he has an auditory processing disorder; he hears maybe every third or fourth word people say. It explained so much. I understand how hard it is to learn to read and to develop language skills if you can’t properly hear what is spoken to you. You’ve come a long way and achieved much. Thank you for your vote.

Nicki: thank you, nice to see you here.

Mike: thanks for your vote

John: both songs can be a bit depressing. Thhanks for your vote.

Saint Mac: Glad you came back with such a well thought comment. You, anti-social? Wow. Can’t imagine that. You’ve had such a wonderfully full life, met so many fascinating people. I love reading your adventures on your blog. They lift my spirits. I never heard that Beach Boys song, but it does suit your personality. Thanks for sharing the link, I loved the song, and the instruments were awesome. It is hard to vote against Bocephus, especially if you’ve seen him in concert. He was quite the party hound for a long time. Used to be the expected norm for celebrities. As for your abandoned projects; you just have a short attention span, lol. It seems you still have those ideas still rolling around your head, and blogging seems to be a viable outlet for those ideas. Hang in there good buddy; let the medicine do its job. Rest, relax, feel better soon.

Robin said...

Dolorah,

Both of the songs struck me as sad. Seems like our parents end up being the most definitive relationship we have. My vote goes to Hank, though I appreciate the other song, too. The lyric about the personalization of the stamp... Excellent.

Still my vote is for Hank. It was more musical to these ears.

Patsy said...

You're quite right that we do need to believe in ourselves to some extent and that this doesn't have to mean being arrogant.

Debbie D. said...

Mentally retarded? That's a horrible diagnose to carry around for anyone, let alone a child. So glad you were able to get past that, with the help of the "Little Engine" and "The Fight Song" You're so right about believing in yourself, first! There's a difference between that and arrogance. Poseurs tend to be the arrogant ones, in my opinion, not genuine people. Your gift for writing is obvious in this post and also the WEP. I'd love to read other things you have to offer. On to BOTB...
Both of these songs are heartbreaking and ones I haven't heard before. Hank Williams Jr. has a fabulous voice and his song triggered the more intense emotional response. Please give my vote to him. The Pink Floyd video was heartwrenching, though.

Cherie Reich said...

If we don't keep going and believe in ourselves, we'll never get anywhere.

Donna K. Weaver said...

I love that song! I think it's a great theme song for perseverance because life (and people) and plenty willing to beat us down.

Nick Wilford said...

I think all writers struggle with self-belief. Of course, we also have to be careful not to go too far the other way and stop pushing ourselves to do better. It can be sad when we end up letting go of a well-loved project, but I also think nothing is truly wasted because it'll always hold lessons for us. This was a thought-provoking post.

VR Barkowski said...

With the exception of a single short story, there is an inverse correlation between what I consider my best work and what gets published. My confidence as a writer is relatively strong (albeit realistic), while confidence in my ability to judge the marketability of a work is nonexistent. I just turned a finished manuscript over to my agent, all the time wondering: is it weak enough to publish?

VR Barkowski

Birgit said...

My hubby has ADHD and was told he was "slow" when he was young.....how horrible is that? All the people who suffer from some learning disability were labelled which affected their whole life. Actually people with ADD or ADHD have high intelligence but just can't learn in the regular manner. My song during school years was "We Are The Champions" by Queen because I was severely bullied ending up in the emergency room every year because kids tried to breaks my fingers or they knocked me out with a soccer ball. Anywhoo, we survived and are stronger for it. Love both songs and what they represent but I am giving it to Pink Floyd because it touched me more.

Elsie Amata said...

I love this: "I might only have one match, but I can make an explosion." Fantastic inspiration!

Self-doubt can still creep in on me at times. I haven't been writing for very long so I tend to doubt my skills. I wonder if anyone would want to read what I write. I have to remind myself that I don't just write for others, I write for me as a form of therapy, and then to help others in the process, if I can. That helps ease those doubts...a bit. ;)

cleemckenzie said...

The Little Engine That Could must have inspired a lot of kids to keep going in spite of the odds. I remember it as one of my favorite books even before I extended the metaphor to include me.

I'm choosing Floyd on this round.

Chrys Fey said...

Fight Song has become my anthem. I love it. Whenever I hear it, I feel stronger, able to take on anything. :)

A Beer For The Shower said...

Sorry we're late! It's probably because we're both mentally retarded.

Yeesh, the school system was crazy back then, wasn't it? In that same era, my mother was told she was stupid and would never excel (because she's Mexican).

Cast my vote for Hank Jr.

Gina Gao said...

I really enjoy listening to Fight Song, it has definitely helped me continue writing.


www.ficklemillennial.com

Natalie Aguirre said...

What a great inspirational story. And you have so persevered in your writing. I agree with you that not all manuscripts can be revived. Probably my first one that I worked on for 8 years or more is in that category.

Michael Offutt, Phantom Reader said...

That Rachel Platten song is pretty good, but it has a rhythm about it that kind of causes me to get fatigued if I hear it more than once a week or so. I think my tastes in music are leaning more toward classical or jazz these days...more instrumental than words.

I finally got internet again. Next time you're in SLC and need a room, give me a ring. I could save you some money so that you don't have to get a room in a hotel.